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About Sickkids
About SickKids

Cho Y. Pang, PhD

Research Institute
Senior Emeritus Scientist
Translational Medicine

University of Toronto
Professor
Physiology & Surgery


Phone: 416-813-6899
Fax: 416-813-8724
Email: pang@sickkids.ca

Brief Biography

Dr. Cho Pang took his undergraduate and postgraduate training from 1965 to1975, and was a lecturer from 1975 to1976 at the University of Manitoba. Subsequently, he took three years (1977-1980) of postdoctoral research training at Yale University School of Medicine. Pang started his research career as an assistant professor in 1980 in the Department of Surgery at the Southwestern Medical School in the University of Texas Health Science Centre at Dallas. In 1982, he returned to Canada to become a scientist in the Research Institute of The Hospital for Sick Children (SickKids), and an assistant professor in the Department of Surgery, Department of Physiology, Institute of Medical Science and the School of Graduate Studies at the University of Toronto. He was promoted to a senior scientist and an associate professor in 1985, and a full professor in 1991. He was the head of the Division of Surgical Research in the Research Institute from 1988-1998. Currently, Pang is a senior scientist in the Translational Medicine program in the Research Institute and a full professor at the University of Toronto.

Research Interests

  • Ischemic necrosis in skin flap surgery
  • Skeletal muscle ischemia/reperfusion injury in transplantation and replantation surgery

Research Activities

Two areas of research are being pursued by my research group. One area of research focuses on prevention/treatment of skeletal muscle ischemia/reperfusion injury. There are many surgical procedures in which skeletal muscle is subjected to warm global ischemia. For example, in elective musculoskeletal and vascular reconstructive surgery, single or multiple skeletal muscles are subjected to global ischemia under vascular clamp or tourniquet control. In trauma surgery, multiple skeletal muscles are subjected to global ischemia as a result of amputation, vascular obstruction or compression. Human skeletal muscle can withstand ~2.5h of warm global ischemia. Ischemic insult may be prolonged by unpredictable complication (e.g. vasospasm and/or thrombosis) occurring perioperatively in selective surgery, and by a delay in surgical intervention in trauma surgery. Protracted ischemic insult can cause skeletal muscle ischemia/reperfusion injury, ranging from loss of function or infarction in a single muscle to life-threatening acidosis, hyperkalemia and myoglobinurea in the case of massive skeletal muscle infarction. Our research focuses on identification of pre and postischemic pharmacological therapy for prevention/salvage of ischemic skeletal muscle from ischemia/reperfusion injury. We use animal models for in vivo studies and human skeletal muscle for in vitro studies.

Our second area of research focuses on augmentation of skin flap viability in reconstructive surgery. A large, deep wound is often formed as a result of injury, ulceration, tumour excision or congenital malformation. Skin flaps are routinely used for wound coverage to prevent infection and damage to expoed tissues. The most common clinical problem in skin flap surgery is distal ischemic necrosis due to unpredictable vasospasm thrombosis and insufficient vascularity. Our current research focuses on the efficacy and mechanism of local subdermal angiogenic and arteriogenic cytokine gene therapy for augmentation of skin flap vascularity, blood flow and viability in animal models.

Future Research Interests

We are in the forefront in identifying pharmacological therapy for prevention/salvage of ischemic skeletal muscle from ischemia/reperfusion injury in elective and trauma reconstructive surgery. We have recently developed an in vitro model for the study of the efficacy and mechanism of preischemic and postischemic pharmacological conditioning of human skeletal muscle against ischemia/reperfusion injury. Results from this in vitro study with human skeletal muscle will confirm our findings with the animal model in vivo and will provide important insights into the identification of effective drugs for near future clinical trials in protection/salvage of skeletal muscle from ischemia/reperfusion injury in reconstructive surgery.

Recently we have started a new research project to study the paediatric craniofacial bone growth diseases supported by a Plastic surgery Endowment Fund. We have now generated enough preliminary data and publications to apply for new external funding.

External Funding

  1. Angiogenic cytokine gene therapy for optimal augmentation of skin flap viability: Efficacy and mechanism (CIHR operating grant; Principal investigator).
  2. Perioperative protection and postischemic salvage of skeletal muscle from ischemia/reperfusion injury (CIHR operating grant; Principal investigator).
  3. Industrial Fund and Wharton Endowment Fund (Co-investigator).

Publications

McAllister SE, Ashrafpour H, Cahoon N, Huang N, Moses MA, Neligan PC, Forrest CR, Lipa JE, Pang CY. Postconditioning for salvage off ischemic skeletal muscle from reperfusion injury: efficacy and mechanism. Am J Physiol 295 (2): R681-9, 2008.

Gevorgyan A, Sukhu B, Alman BA, Bristow RG, Pang CY, Forrest CR. Radiation effects and radioprotection in MC3T3-E1 mouse calvarial osteoblastic cells. Plast Reconstr Surg. 122(4):1025-35, 2008.

Gevorgyan AM, La Scala GC, Sukhu B, Leung IT, Ashrafpour H, Yeung I, Neligan PC, Pang CY, Forrest CR. Radiation-induced craniofacial bone growth inhibition: in vitro cytoprotection in the rabbit orbitozygomatic complex periosteum-derived cell culture. Plast Reconstr Surg 121(3): 763-71, 2008.

Gevorgyan AM, La Scala GC, Sukhu B, Leung IT, Ashrafpour H, Yeung I, Neligan PC, Pang CY, Forrest CR. An in vitro model of radiation-induced craniofacial bone growth inhibition. J Craniofac Surg. 18(5): 1044-50, 2007.

Gevorgyan AM, La Scala GC, Neligan PC, Pang CY, Forrest CR. Radiation-induced craniofacial bone growth disturbances. J Craniofac Surg. 18(5): 1001-7, 2007.

Gevorgyan AM, La Scala GC, Neligan PC, Pang CY, Forrest CR. Radioprotection of craniofacial bone growth. J Craniofac Surg. 18(5): 995-1000, 2007.

Moses MA, Addison PD, Neligan PC, Ashrafpour H, Huang N, McAllister SE, Lipa JE, Forrest CR, Pang CY. Inducing late phase of infarct protection in skeletal muscle by remote preconditioning: efficacy and mechanism. Am J Physiol. 289(6): R1609-17, 2005.

Martou G, O’Blenes CA, Huang N, McAllister SE, Neligan PC, Ashrafpour H, Pang CY, Lipa JE. Development of an in vitro model for study of the efficacy of ischemic preconditioning in human skeletal muscle against ischemia/reperfusion injury. J Appl Physiol. 101(5): 1335-42, 2006.

Huang N, Khan A, Ashrafpour H, Neligan PC, Forrest CR, Kontos CD, Pang CY. Efficacy and mechanism of adenovirus-mediated VEGF-165 gene therapy for augmentation of skin flap viability. Am J Physiol. 291(1): H127-37, 2006.

Lee H, Koehler DR, Pang CY, Levine RH, Ng P, Palmer DJ, Quinton PM, Hu J. Gene delivery to human sweat glands: a model for cystic fibrosis gene therapy. Gene Ther 12(24): 1752-60, 2005

La Scala GC, O’Donovan DA, Yeung I, Darko J, Addison PD, Neligan PC, Pang CY, Forrest CR. Radiation-induced craniofacial bone growth inhibition: efficacy of cytoprotection following a fractionated dose regimen. Plast Recontr Surg. 115(7): 1973-85, 2005.

Neligan PC, Pang CY. Pathophysiology of perforated skin flaps: In: Perforator Flaps: Anatomy, technique and clinical application. Edited by P Blondeel, SF Morris, GG Hallock and PC Neligan. Quality Medical Publication Inc. St. Louis, MO. Chapter 5, pp 71-89, 2005

Moses MA, Addison PD, Neligan PC, Ashrafpour H, Huang N, Zair M, Rassouli A, Forrest CR, Grover GJ, Pang CY. Mitochondrial KATP channels in hindlimb remote ischemic preconditioning of skeletal muscle against infarction. Am J Physiol Heart Circ Physiol. 288(2): H559-67, 2005.

Khan A, Ashrafpour H, Huang N, Neligan PC, Kontos C, Zhong A, Forrest CR, Pang CY. Acute local subcutaneous VEGF165 injection for augmentation of skin flap viability: efficacy and mechanism. Am J Physiol. 287(5): R1219-29, 2004.

Ashrafpour H, Huang N, Neligan PC, Forrest CR, Addison PD, Moses MA, Levine RH, Pang CY. Vasodilator effect and mechanism of action of vascular endothelial growth factor in skin vasculature. Am J Physiol. 286(3): H946-54, 2004.