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About SickKids

December 22, 2014

SickKids team awarded grant to study causes of inflammation in chronic diseases like IBD and arthritis in children

A research team at The Hospital for Sick Children (SickKids) is one of nine new research projects to be funded by the Government of Canada through the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) and its partners – The Arthritis Society and Crohn’s and Colitis Canada. The projects were funded under CIHR’s Roapmap Signature Initiative on Inflammation in Chronic Disease and will explore the relationship between inflammation and chronic diseases like inflammatory bowel disease and arthritis.

The announcement was made on Dec. 22, 2014 by Eve Adams, Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Health and Member of Parliament for Mississauga – Brampton South, on behalf of Honourable Rona Ambrose, Minister of Health, following a tour of the Peter Gilgan Centre for Research and Learning at SickKids where she visited with Dr. John Brumell, Senior Scientist at SickKids and leader of one of the nine research teams.

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From left to right: SickKids' Dr. John Brumell, SickKids patient family Kate and Robbie Murray, CIHR's Dr. Serge Desnoyers, SickKids' Dr. Janet Rossant, PS Eve Adams, Crohn's and Colitis Canada's Aida Fernandes, The Arthritis Society's Jonathan Riley, CIHR's Dr. Phil Sherman.

 

“Our Government is committed to helping improve the lives of Canadians affected by chronic diseases. This critical investment has the potential to transform the way we approach many chronic diseases, leading to better care for Canadian patients,” says PS Adams.

Dr. Brumell and his team will focus on a group of genes called NADPH oxidase genes, as these genes play a major role in the immune system and are altered in both IBD and arthritis.

“This grant brings together a team of clinicians and scientists from across Canada with one common goal: to better understand inflammation and how it can cause inflammatory bowel disease and arthritis in children,” says Brumell. “We are studying how NADPH oxidase genes regulate inflammation and what the best ways to treat individuals with these genetic alterations. This is a big step in the direction of personalized medicine, which is about treating patients as an individual, not as a demographic.”

The nine projects will be supported with funding of $21.9M over five years from the CIHR, The Arthritis Society and Crohn’s and Colitis Canada. The SickKids project received $2.4 million.  

“SickKids is proud to lead one of the nine projects of the CIHR Health Challenges in Chronic Inflammation Initiative. We are grateful for this significant investment from CIHR, The Arthritis Society, and Crohn’s and Colitis Canada, which recognizes the collaborative efforts of leading Canadian scientists studying chronic inflammatory diseases. These collaborations are not only paving the way for the next major research discoveries, but they are also critical to bringing research from the bench to the bedside and ultimately driving improvements to the health of children and adults with chronic disease,” says Dr. Janet Rossant, Chief of Research at SickKids.

Check out CIHR’s news release for more information: Government of Canada Invests in Innovative Health Research