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About Sickkids
About SickKids

Rebecca Hoban, MD, MPH

The Hospital for Sick Children
Staff Neonatologist
Neonatology

Director of Breastfeeding Medicine
Neonatology

University of Toronto
Assistant Professor
Paediatrics


Phone: 416-813-7654 x202997
Fax: 416-813-5245
Email: rebecca.hoban@sickkids.ca

Brief Biography

In addition to clinical neonatology, Dr. Rebecca Hoban's main research and quality improvement focus is in lactation and human milk feedings in high risk populations, both from a maternal and infant standpoint. Hoban is particularly interested in early predictors of lactation success, especially in mothers with inflammatory conditions like obesity and pre-term labour, and how pre and post-natal exposure to such conditions may affect human milk volumes and components as well as short and long term infant health.

Academic Background

Undergraduate Studies - B.S. Biology (honors) Indiana University, Bloomington, USA
Medical School - MD, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, USA
Graduate School - MPH, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, USA
Residency - Pediatrics, Cincinnati Children’s Hospital and Medical Center, Cincinnati,  USA
Fellowship - Neonatal-Perinatal Medicine, The Floating Hospital for Children at Tufts Medical Center, Boston, USA

Research Interests

Human Milk, Lactation, Obesity, Inflammation

Publications

Top Publications:

  1. Hoban R, Bigger H, Patel AL, Rossman B, Fogg LF, Meier P. Goals for human milk feeding in mothers of very low birth weight infants: How do goals change and are they achieved during the NICU hospitalization? Breastfeeding Medicine 2015; 10(6): 305-11. 
  2. Meier PP, Patel AL, Hoban R, Engstrom JL. Which breast pump for which mother: an evidence-based approach to individualizing breast pump technology. Journal of Perinatology 2016; 36(7): 493-9. 
  3. Fleurant E, Schoeny M, Hoban R, Asiodu IV, Riley B, Meier PP, Bigger H, Patel AL. Barriers to human milk feeding at discharge of very low birth weight infants: Maternal goal setting as a key social factor. Breastfeeding Medicine 2017; 12: 20-27.

Full bibliography