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About Sickkids
About SickKids

Tricia Williams, Ph.D., C.Psych

The Hospital for Sick Children
Psychologist
Psychology


Phone: 416-813-7398
Email: tricia.williams@sickkids.ca

Brief Biography

I received my Ph.D. in Clinical Developmental Psychology from York University under the supervision of Jennifer Connolly. I completed Health Psychology post-doctoral training at the Hospital for Sick Children followed by a Fellowship in Clinical Neuropsychology at the Alberta Children’s Hospital.

In April 2010, I took on my current positions at SickKids as the Neuropsychologist with the Pediatric Lupus Clinic and as the Clinical Psychologist with the Haematology Late Effects Clinic. I am very fortunate in both roles to work with interdisciplinary teams of dedicated professionals who strive to advance our understanding of paediatric health conditions and to set standards for quality patient care.

Clinical & Research Activities

  • Assessment of neuropsychological, academic and socioemotional functioning in children and adolescents with systemic lupus erythematosis (SLE).
  • Psychosocial intervention and consultation with children and youth survivors of cancer.
  • Consultation with patients, parents, educators, team members, and other health care professionals regarding academic planning and community intervention as needed.

Research Interests

  • Neuropsychological effects of systemic lupus erythematosis (SLE)
  • Neurocognitive associates with adolescent transition and self-management skills
  • Adolescent health and transition assessment
  • Cognitive development associated with different neurovascular conditions (e.g., Moya Moya disease, pediatric stroke)

Publications

Williams, T.S., Dunseith, C., Blackman, M., Latter, J., Mah, J., Mohamed, I., Slick, D., Thornton, N. & Sherman, E.M.S. Measurement of medical autonomy among Canadian adolescents with chronic health conditions.(In Press) Journal of International Journal of Child and Adolescent Health.

Macrodimitris, S., Williams, T.S., Wiebe, S., & Sherman, E.M.S. Patient satisfaction following epilepsy surgery.(Under Review) Epilepsia.

Connolly, J., Nocentini, A., Menesini, E., Pepler, D., Craig, W., & Williams, T. (2010). Adolescent Dating Aggression in Canada and Italy:  A Cross-National Comparison.  International Journal of Behavioral Development.

Williams TS, Sherman EMS, Strauss E (2010). Modified Mini-Mental State Examination. In JS Kreutzer, J DeLuca & B Caplan (Eds). Encyclopedia of clinical neuropsychology.  New York: Springer.

Sherman EMS, Williams TS, Sarnat HB, Hamiwka LD, Mohamed I, Wiebe S, Hader WJ. (2010). Malformations of cortical development: Histopathological subtypes and clinical outcomes after pediatric epilepsy surgery. [Abstract]. Canadian Journal of Neurological Sciences.

McGrath, P.A., & Williams, T.  (2009). Pain in Children. In Binder, M. D., Hirokawa, N.,  Windhorst, U., Encyclopedia of Neuroscience. Berlin: Springer; p. 3071-3074.

Sherman EMS, Williams TS, Sarnat HB, Hamiwka LD, Mohamed I, Wiebe S, Hader WJ. (2008). Pediatric epilepsy surgery and malformations of cortical development: Histopathological subtypes, cognitive level, seizure outcome and quality of life. [Abstract]. Epilepsia.

Williams, T., Connolly, J., Pepler, D., & Craig, W.  (2008). Risk Models of Dating Aggression across Different Adolescent Relationships: A Developmental Psychopathology Approach. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 76, 622-32.

Williams, T., Connolly, J., & Cribbie, R. (2008). Light and Heavy Heterosexual Activities of Young Canadian Adolescents: Normative Patterns and Differential Predictors.  Journal of Research on Adolescence, 18, 145-172.

Williams, T., Connolly, J., Pepler, D., & Craig, W.  (2005). Peer Victimization, Social Support and Psychosocial Adjustment of Sexual Minority Adolescents. Journal of Youth and Adolescence, 34, 471 – 482.

Williams, T., Connolly, J., Pepler, D., & Craig, W. (2003). Questioning and sexual minority adolescents: High school experiences of bullying, sexual harassment and physical abuse. Canadian Journal of Community Mental Health, 22, 47-58.