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Neurosurgery
Neurosurgery

CIGITI International Surgical Robotics Award

SickKids CIGITI Team wins international contest for the Best Robotics Development

Hamlyn Robotics Award Winners - SickKids NeurosurgeryThe Hamlyn Robotics Symposium is hosted by Imperial College in London. After 8 years, it has become one of the largest international meetings devoted to surgical robotics. This is the fourth year the SickKids team has attended.  

The team for the robotics challenge was Karl Price, Kunj Upadhyaya, Thomas Looi, Kyle Eastwood, Vivek Bodani, Dale Podolsky and Hamidreza Azimian all from the CIGITI lab - Centre of Image Guided Innovation and Therapeutic Intervention (CIGITI). It was a contest for the best robotic development on a DaVinci Test Kit (a refurbished first generation DaVinci System, where teams have full access to the hardware and software) or other similar robotic systems. There were 26 original proposals, reduced to 18 from robotic centres from around the world including major medical robotic centres at John Hopkins, Stanford, UBC, CSTARR at the University of Western Ontario, Imperial College London etc. These groups all came to London (UK) to demonstrate their system.

The project was entitled "a concentric tube tool for the DaVinci Research Kit". The device developed by the SickKids team was a novel miniaturized 1.4 mm concentric tube grasping forceps which attaches to a DaVinci System.  It could be used for many applications including intraventricular neurosurgery, Cardiac Surgery, and trans-oral surgery.  Its novelty includes its very small size, and the ability to rapidly change the tools called "hot swapping".  

Following the live demo, each group presented to the judging panel in a kind of "Dragon's Den" format. The SickKids team made it to the final four by winning the "best design" category. The final four presented to the whole symposium group, and then to their astonishment, the SickKids team won the entire contest.

Read more about the Hamlyn Surgical Award Robotics Challenge 2015.  


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